Sunday, 15 June 2014

“Turkish Water for Turkish Cyprus”

Turkish water pipeline to Northern Cyprus

Will the pipeline deliver more than water alone?




The much vaunted and long awaited water pipeline, which will become the physical link between motherland Turkey and Turkish Cyprus is now expected to be finally connected early next year. Delivering some 70 Million cubic metres of potable water directly into the Gecitköy reservoir, this hugely valuable resource has the capability of augmenting vitally needed drinking water to the island as a whole. Whether this initiative could be a positive bargaining chip for the Turkish Cypriot negotiators during the ‘talks’, is a matter for conjecture, for it is entirely likely that the Orthodox Church will dismiss Turkish water as ‘evil’  just as it did with electricity supplies from North Cyprus, after one of south Cyprus’ power stations blew up last year. 


It had been speculated that the pipeline project would be completed by September of this year, but the bad winter had a considerable impact on progress and further delays have now been encountered. A project of this magnitude does however, tend to contain the potential for unforeseen circumstances; most civil engineering projects do, from the writers close personal experience, and a complex scheme such as this one, can be no exception to the rule. Submarine topography is one thing, but security of the facility especially in this region, will be another significant factor and a high degree of secrecy envelopes the management of this project.

There has been a lot of speculation that in addition to the supply of seemingly endless quantities of high quality drinking water, the pipeline could also support, via fibre optic cables ‘piggy-backing’ the pipeline bearing Hydro Electric Power. There are no technical reasons why this added benefit could not be achieved (save for security measures) but very little is being revealed as to Turkey’s intentions in this regard. 

The flags on the hill to remind the Greeks of their 'place'


Clearly, any measure especially a ‘clean, green’ one, which bears electricity to Northern Cyprus, is going to be very much welcomed, for as recent articles have revealed, the TRNC is close to its limits in terms of electricity generation at the present time. HEP, in conjunction with other ‘green energy’ projects would materially benefit the Turkish Cypriot economy by a very considerable degree indeed. Municipal Waste to Energy, depending upon plant type and size selected, could add 50 MWH to the grid daily. Add to this, Bio-Waste to Energy and possibly HEP too, the potential for an energy surplus is a real one.

Quite how the government of the south Cyprus regime would view its neighbour being armed with energy self-reliance does not take too much thought or speculation. The reaction would be one of indignant jealousy added to other negative outbursts. On the other hand, this columnist learned from contacts in the south of the island, that there are plans to construct a Bio-Waste to energy plant on a diary farm however this would produce only some 2 MWH. The government have placed limits by way of its licensing regime in this respect. It is further understood that household waste too, might be converted to energy using a plant designed by an Austrian/Canadian consortium, in the same location.

Surely it cannot be beyond the wit of Turkish Cypriot politicians to realise that not only is energy self-sufficiency for Northern Cyprus a key goal, but it is highly attainable too and within a relatively short time-frame as well. For example, a Municipal Waste to Energy plant of a size that would deliver 25 MWH continuously, 7 days a week for at least 300 days per annum. There is nothing to stop a second such plant from being constructed especially if garbage could also be imported for energy conversion purposes.

Green-Energy (yeşil enerji) that includes HEP from Turkey via the pipeline, waste to energy conversion initiatives AND solar power, can all materially augment the energy needs of Northern Cyprus and power the country towards the ‘nirvana’ of energy self-sufficiency. It has to be the hope of the citizens and residents of Turkish Cyprus that their politicians avail themselves of the opportunities that now freely present themselves.

By

Chris Green  

Beşparmak Media Services



Tuesday, 10 June 2014

The Energy aspect of the Cyprus Question-

‘Dirty’ versus ‘Green energy’

AKSA Power Plant - Northern Cyprus



For many years, Turkish Cyprus has heavily relied on electricity produced from the oil-fired power station at Kalecik - İskele/Boğaz operated by the power company, AKSA Energy. Something in the order of 150 MWH of electricity comes from this source.  It has recently come to light that for reasons best known to AKSA Energy, they have failed to maintain their Flue Gas Desulphurisation filters (FGD) and this has resulted in high levels of Sulphur Dioxide entering the atmosphere.

To explain more thoroughly, Flue Gas Desulphurisation, generally referred to as FGD, is the technology utilised in the removal of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from the flue gases of power plants burning coal or oil that produce steam for the turbines. These turbines drive their electricity generators. The most common types of FGD contact the flue gases with an alkaline sorbent such as gypsum, lime or limestone. If these vital pieces of plant are not fitted, the production of what we now commonly call “Acid Rain" is inevitable and the impact on the environment is colossal. 

Their importance cannot be under-estimated, yet the technology is freely available throughout the world. We have no idea why AKSA Energy has failed to properly maintain this vital power station correctly; it could be economic, incompetence, mismanagement or a combination of all. It nevertheless shows Turkish Cyprus in a poor light at a most inopportune moment in time.


 Over the past two years and certainly in recent weeks, this column has actively promoted various types of renewable energy conversion processes which when combined could materially aid energy-self sufficiency goals not only of Turkish Cyprus, but many countries the world over. Solar, Wind, Waste to Energy (Municipal Waste or Bio) are all viable sources of valuable energy and more importantly they are clean or ‘green’ to use modern terminology. In a recent move, Turkey now aims to scale-up renewables by 30 percent by 2023 with the second fastest rise in demand for energy in the world after China. 

ILISU Hydroelectric Power Plant- Turkey


In 2013, Turkey generated 70% of its energy requirements from fossil fuels, 25% from Hydro Electric Power and the remainder from wind/solar sources. The vast majority of the fossil fuelled energy derives from reliance upon external suppliers and at last the energy ministry is looking towards home-generated energy sources and with renewables, as has been highlighted and explained in some detail by this column recently, Turkey has the necessary resources to hand; in fact it is all around us especially Municipal Waste.

Turkey consumed 245.5 billion kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity in 2013 and Turkey’s total electricity consumption for 2014 is estimated to be 256 billion kilowatt-hour (kWh), an increase of 4.1 percent compared to last year, according to the Turkish Electricity Production Company (TEIAS). A study by the country's Energy Ministry has revealed that Turkey's electricity demand will reach 620 billion kilowatt per hour. According to reports, Turkey plans to generate 15 percent of its electricity from hydropower, 12 percent from wind and geothermal power, 11 percent from nuclear energy, 5 percent from solar power and 2 percent from others by 2030. There is neither word, nor consideration for either Municipal or Bio Waste energy conversion within these studies: The relevant industrial bodies need to do a great deal more, therefore to raise awareness at the right levels.

Waste to Energy processes achieve far more for the environment than energy production alone whilst of course, it is the primary requirement. W2E sites materially consume both Municipal Waste and via anaerobic digestion systems, food and animal waste too. Millions upon Millions of metric tonnes of these forms of waste are to be found rotting in tips and landfill sites not only across Turkey but all around the world. Converting this freely available material to energy and other by-products by clean processes greatly benefit the local and wider environment too. 



Furthermore, a Municipal Waste to Energy plant of a size that processes 1000 Metric Tonnes per Day, would employ at least 200 people per shift quite apart from the opportunities for additional employment with the transport infrastructure that could be generated from the creation of these energy farms, which themselves could host solar arrays and wind turbines too. Each W2E plant can be housed on a solar dome too which would have the positive environmental effect of dampening ambient noise and not only would this be more visually pleasing, it also contributes to the energy conversion equation.

The Government of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus are now looking at Waste to Energy processes to not only lift some of the burden from traditional ‘dirty energy’ sources but also to materially aid the environmental blight the north of the island suffers from in recent years. The TRNC could lead the region in pioneering energy conversion, the ‘green way’.

By

Chris Green

Beşparmak Media Services
 


Wednesday, 4 June 2014

Mediterranean Gas: Energy Options for Northern Cyprus.







Cyprus - forever divided.


In the true spirit of rapprochement Greek Cypriot style, the south Cyprus regime now plan to initiate a feasibility study to assess the merits of transporting gas from the Eastern Mediterranean to European markets, via Crete. This would – for the Greeks – mean cutting out Turkey and Turkish Cyprus from the gaseous sub-marine fruits of the earth that are in reality, co-owned. It would also put paid to any notions, slim though they are, of an equitable settlement on the Cyprus Question in general. But this Greek initiative is wholly typical of the species.




It has to be the bitterest ironies of all time, particularly in relation to historical Greco-Turkish affairs, that the island of Crete is being suggested as a node point for gas transit given that during the 19th century, some 200,000 ethnic Turks were ‘displaced’ from the island, with Turkish Cypriots next in line for similar ‘treatment’ during the 20th century. The Biden visit notwithstanding, it would not be unreasonable to speculate that US ‘interests’ would be sated even if the Med gas gets to Europe via Greece, because that really is the sum of United States ambitions in the region; that of the complete control of energy resources. Denied much of a bargaining chip, Turkish Cypriots would be frozen out completely. Ostracising Turkey in this manner however, is a very high risk strategy.




As previous and recent articles by this column have suggested, Turkish Cyprus does have tricks up her sleeve in relation to energy conversion. Presently, the total energy requirement for Northern Cyprus is 250 MWH which is just inside the maximum current capacity of 295 MWH that Turkish Cyprus can produce. However, with the advent of the water pipeline which will form the physical connection between motherland Turkey and Turkish Cyprus this September, there will be a requirement for a further 20MWH to pump the water through the infrastructure. There is little remaining in the energy bank, so to speak, for any further economic growth in the north of the island: Additional resources are needed and soon.





There is already a Waste to Energy plant under construction in Northern Cyprus which once completed and operational will consume the waste material from the Hellim cheese production industry and waste food in general.  The latter is being built by a German company and is funded by a German bank. To a degree, solar power is also making a contribution but far more could be derived from this source alone. In his recent article entitled “Waste to Energy: A responsible solution for lower energy costs” the writer explains how a Municipal Waste to Energy plant could be built to consume up to 1000 metric tonnes of waste feed per day, which in turn would yield 25 MWH of electricity.





There will of course, be those who climb aboard the ‘nimby’ wagon and condemn such proposals on grounds of visual blight and emissions from what they, as laymen might label as an incinerator. In fact, emissions from this pyrolysis waste processing plant are fully EU Directive compliant. Furthermore, the entire plant can be completely housed within a Solar-clad dome building which not only has the effect of dampening ambient noise levels, such as they are, but also ‘softening’ visual impact too. A further plus here, is that the solar panels too produce electricity. This would so clearly be a win-win situation all around especially for the wider and mixed Turkish Cypriot community in general.




Additionally comforting for Northern Cyprus is, that if acted upon quickly a Waste to Energy plant could be fully operational well before even so much as a whiff of gas is smelt in commercially viable quantities, to the south-east of the island. A combination of both existing and proposed renewable sources, together with a HEP connection along the water pipeline from Turkey, rather than playing catch-up, Turkish Cyprus becomes the energy-leader on the island and at long last, would be ahead of its game in relation the ongoing battle of wills with their recalcitrant and oft belligerent neighbours, the Greek Cypriots.




As always and perhaps not unreasonably, the question of project finance arises and a Municipal Waste to Energy plant, at approximately $4.5M per Megawatt is not a small amount to fund, nor too is the solar dome that could house such a facility. As with the German W2E plant alluded to above, project funding is also available for Municipal Waste with Solar Housing too. One such funding method is by way of a Power Purchase Agreement which is based upon the feed-in tariff but there are also European Banks who are geared up to fund energy-conversion projects and the status of the TRNC as such, is no bar to international funding, as has been seen previously. Given the entirely divergent nature of the current ‘Settlement Talks’ process, the opportunities that now present to the Turkish Cypriot Government, are too valuable to be over-looked.

By

Chris Green

Beşparmak Media Services
 

“The abuse of Women’s Rights abound”

Farzana Parveen, 25, who was three months pregnant, was killed by nearly 20 members of the woman's family, including her father and brothers in Lahore.

Sacrificed upon the altar of ‘religion’



By



Chris Green



The world’s media in recent months have been filled with accounts of the most horrific incidents of abuse, kidnap, rape and murder of women and girls in a variety of countries. The common denominator under-pinning the majority of these crimes, appears to be that of religion or at least interpretations thereof as a justification for the acts of males (they cannot be described as men) against vulnerable women and girls. At a time when legions of Islamophobes need little excuse to attack those of the Muslim Faith, more ammunition is freely delivered to them by way of these barbarous acts overseas.



In South Sudan, a 27 year old, married woman now languishes in jail awaiting the delivery of 100 lashes for adultery, to be followed by the death penalty by hanging, for apostasy. Meriam Ibrahim, herself a doctor was brought up in the Christian faith, married a US (Christian) citizen of Sudanese origins and, because the South Sudanese authorities do not recognise their marriage, she was found guilty of adultery. She has just given birth to a daughter whilst in jail, which is the second child to this couple. Both children are held in prison with her in reportedly appalling conditions. Having been given time to recant her Christian Faith, which she has refused, she will be hanged in two years time unless international pressure successfully intervenes in the meantime.



In Pakistan recently, a woman was attacked and stoned to death by her own father and close relatives for the ‘crime’ of marrying a man of her own choice, for mutual love. Her father’s ‘honour’ having been impugned, the couple were ambushed outside of a courthouse where they had had their marriage registered and despite her husbands vain attempts to protect her, she died the most unimaginable death as did her unborn child inside her. Sometime ago, also in Sudan, a 13 year old girl was buried up to her neck and then stoned to death for adultery. She had been gang-raped, and her father reported this to the authorities that the perpetrators might be apprehended; this proved to be fatal for the poor defenceless girl as described.



More recently, and in India this time two girls aged 14 and 15 respectively were found hanging from a Mango tree following their both having been gang-raped. Crimes of this nature are tragically common-place in the subcontinent, but this particular outrage has caused a wholly justifiable outcry across the entire nation and internationally too. Images of these poor girls hanging from the tree were compelling enough, but the wider spectacle of the crowds that gathered beneath them made for deeper thought and reflection too. In these images, women are clearly sobbing with grief and perhaps empathy too, for there is every reason to suspect that one or more of them might have been previously subjected to such an ordeal.



In the latter case, there seems to be no link to Islam whereas in the previous examples, religion appears to be used as some sort of justification for the actions taken. The same applies to the Boko Harem group in Nigeria who have recently carried out a mass-capture of hundreds of young girls and have threatened to sell them into slavery and other such horrific fates including sex-crimes upon them, all in the name of their perverted interpretation of what after all is a peaceful religion.

It is the strongly held view of this writer, that every penny of the £42+ Millions of aid granted to South Sudan by the UK should now be withheld, certainly until such time as Dr Meriam Ibrahim and her children are released from prison. Similarly so, all aid should be halted to Pakistan whilst India does not really need the aid the UK gives anyway!



The murder of the young and pregnant, lawfully married Pakistani woman who married the man of her choice for love, is particularly poignant. Choosing ones words with precise and deliberate detail, until such a time that a man and woman are free to marry each other for mutual love, irrespective of creed, colour or religious calling this world nor any country in it, will be truly multi-cultural nor indeed free.

Beşparmak Media Services